Nov
6
3:50pm 3:50pm

Day 2 Closing: Jefferson County MCI Response

Andrew Slemp

The learner will develop an awareness-level understanding of a multi-agency response to a Mass Casualty Incident in the field, as it pertained to a particular incident in East Tennessee. This includes an awareness-level understanding of the East Tennessee Regional Medical Communication Center and its capabilities. The learner will develop an awareness-level understanding of critical trauma patient management in the field by Helicopter Air Medical Crews. As well as develop an awareness-level understanding of the importance of multi-agency collaboration and the ability to procure necessary assets to mitigate a multi-casualty incident.

 Andrew Slemp  is Operations Manager - Flight Medic for UT LIFESTAR he also serves as a Reserve Police Officer / Tactical Medic for Morristown Police Department as well as Paramedic Program Board Member / Adjunct Faculty at Walters State Community College


Retirement of Colors
     Tennessee Highway Patrol Honor Guard
Conference Summary, Evaluations, and Q&A
     T.E.P.S. Staff

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Nov
6
12:30pm12:30pm

Breakout 2:

First Half: Pediatric Death Investigation-

Adele Lewis, MD
Deputy Chief Medical Examiner for Davidson County

Investigation of sudden, unexpected deaths in children calls for a unique approach and requires the cooperation and collaboration of law enforcement, first responders, pediatricians, child protective services, and forensic pathologists. In this session we will discuss the proper procedures for the investigation of a death of a child, including differences between in injury patterns in children and adults with respect to different mechanisms, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation; completing the state-mandated Sudden Unexplained Infant Death Investigation (SUIDI) and Sudden Unexplained Child Death Investigation (SUCDI) Reports; doll re-enactments; mechanisms and classification of sleep-related deaths in infants; patterns of injuries which may be suggestive of abusive injuries to a child; scene documentation and photography, with particular attention to sleep environments and potential hazards in the home; mimics of child abuse injuries; and the plausibility of reported mechanisms of injury in cases of possible inflicted trauma.

Dr. Lewis is the Deputy Chief Medical Examiner for Davidson County. She is a graduate of University of Alabama School of Medicine. She completed her fellowship in Anatomic Pathology at Vanderbilt School of Medicine as well as a Fellowship in Forensic Pathology at the Office of the Medical Examiner for the State of Tennessee. Dr lewis holds appointments at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: Department of Pathology and the National Forensic Academy as well as being Board Certified in Anatomic Pathology and Forensic pathology.

Second Half: Youth Suicide Awareness & Prevention -

Evelyn Hill & Lacy Potts
Jason Foundation

JFI has grown to be one of the nation’s leading non-profits addressing the national health problem of youth suicide. In 2013, the JFI National Network, consisting of offices across the nation, provided one or more of our program / educational services to over 1.8 million individuals and over 2 million EAP clients.  JFI’s corporate office is located in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Since 1998, The Jason Foundation has reached more than one million young people, parents, teachers and community members. The Jason Foundation’s goal is to provide outstanding educational materials on youth suicide awareness and prevention.  The youth curriculum, “A Promise for Tomorrow”, has been in use since October 1997 and has undergone four major revisions. This program has been presented to over 1,000,000 young people across the country and in several foreign countries without one negative response or related incident being reporting.  To ensure that the teaching strategies are based on best practices of instruction and the clinical information is presented in a safe, no-harm manner, JFI has submitted the program to extensive evaluation.  The program has been evaluated using ASCD educational standards and by Vanderbilt University.  Field tests in several different classrooms in four states to determine that students are reaching the goals and objectives of the program. Ninety-eight percent of the students showed gains in knowledge with the average increase being a twenty-four point gain.  Students tested for retention maintained ninety-four percent of the knowledge gain.

 

For more information on the Jason Foundation visit:

http://jasonfoundation.com/about-us/

 

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Nov
6
12:30pm12:30pm

Breakout 1: Active Shooter Triage & Response, High Fidelity Exercise

Medical Center EMS SORT

The expressed and designed purposes of this simulation are as follows:

(1) Provide an introduction to, and understanding of, the law enforcement and emergency medical response to an active shooter event.

(2) Provide an understanding of the difference between “immediate threat” and “zone of diminishing threat”.

(3) Demonstrate the component roles and responsibilities of an active shooter mass casualty incident response.

(4) Define and demonstrate the role of a law enforcement “contact team”.

(5) Define and demonstrate the role of a law enforcement “rescue team”.

(6) Define and demonstrate the roles of “perimeter security” and an “evacuation assistance” teams.

(7) Define and demonstrate “zones of diminishing threat”, including hot zone, warm zone, safety corridor, safety zone and cold zone.

(8) Provide an introduction to the Incident Command System.

(9) Demonstrate use of the SMART Triage system.

(10) Allow participants to function in the component roles during a simulated active shooter mass casualty incident.

(11) Demonstrate and allow participants to utilize new and innovative equipment and tools.

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Nov
6
10:30am10:30am

Main Session #3- Sudden Violence - Surviving an Active Shooter

Brice Allen
Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security

Throughout the United States, acts of sudden and unexpected violence in schools, shopping malls, office buildings, and other public locations have been on the rise. Events like the shootings in Virginia, Colorado, Oregon, and Connecticut raise awareness of this continuing national problem.

This presentation will provide vital information about mitigating the threat posed by individuals who carry out acts of violence, along with information that addresses intervention, clarifies the role of those involved, and how to effectively respond to the problem. (This is not a tactical training course)

Brice Allen is a Homeland Security Agent with the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security. He began his career as a police officer in 1999 with the City of Boca Raton Florida Police Department. Specializing in criminal intelligence gathering, tactical operations, and violent crime investigations, Brice has held assignments in Patrol, Surveillance, Criminal Investigations, and Special Weapons and Tactics (S.W.A.T.)

In 2011, Brice joined the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security as an Intelligence Analyst assigned to the Tennessee Fusion Center and was responsible for coordinating daily operations, tactical intelligence, and domestic terrorism analysis. In 2012, he was promoted to the Homeland Security Training Coordinator.

Brice has a Bachelor of Arts in Homeland Security with coursework in emergency management, international and domestic terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorist ideology and tactics. He has authored several law enforcement related articles and presentations and has received numerous commendations throughout his career for his law enforcement efforts.

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Nov
6
9:15am 9:15am

Main Session #2- Mass Gathering - Preparing For The Big Event

Jared J. McKinney, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Planning and coverage of mass gathering events poses many challenges.  Medical requirements for different events vary considerably and those systems responsible for event coverage need an understanding of the factors that contribute to medical support needs at large mass gatherings.

Topics discussed will include National Event Medicine Guidelines, Mass gathering Planning and Coverage to include:

·         Medical Oversight
·         Medical Reconnaissance
·         Negotiations
·         Human Resources
·         Medical Equipment
·         Treatment Facilities
·         Transportation/Access
·         Operations and Communication

Dr. Jared J. McKinney, M.D. is Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He also serves as Assistant Medical Director of  Metro Nashville Fire Department, Medical Director of LifeFlight Event Medicine and Chairman of the  Vanderbilt University Resuscitation Committee.

 

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Nov
6
8:00am 8:00am

Main Session #1- Creating Engaged Employee Culture

Jeff Masten

Leaders have to understand their own strengths and the strengths of those they are leading to be successful. It sounds elementary; however, I bet most people do not understand their true talents.

Examine a system called Strengths Finder. Through their research, they found that the Top 5 strengths will always surface in the heat of the moment. You can exponentially strengthen those top themes. We will work with you and your team and help you understand yourself.

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Nov
5
3:50pm 3:50pm

Day 1 Closing - Mass Casualty Medicine

Timothy C. Nunez, MD, FACS

The presentation will address state of the art management of mass casualty events.   An overview of the strategies to approach situations triage, resuscitation and management will be discussed

A graduate of Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA ,as well as the  E.M.T. program at Hocking Technical College, Nelsonville, OH. Dr. Timothy Charles Nunez, MD is
 

Associate Professor of Surgery
Director, Trauma Performance Improvement
Associate Program Director, Acute Care Surgery Fellowship
Department of Surgery
Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery & Surgical Critical Care
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, TN 37212

Conference Summary, Evaluations, and Q&A
    TEPS Staff

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Nov
5
2:10pm 2:10pm

Breakout 3b: Proper Use of Personal Protective Equipment for Triage, Monitoring and Management of Travelers returning from Countries with Ongoing Ebola Virus Disease Outbreaks

Dr. Rendi Murphree
Centers For Disease and Prevention

 

This session will provide an overview of Ebola Virus transmission, review precautions recommended for management of hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola virus disease, and review guidelines for the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when evaluating; 1) travelers returning from West Africa, 2) contacts of suspected or known Ebola patients, and 3) hospitalized patients under investigation or treatment for Ebola Virus Disease.  Participants will have the opportunity to practice proper donning, doffing, and disposal of PPE.

Objective 1:  Participants should learn routes of Ebola Virus transmission.

Answer:  Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with

·         blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola

·         objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus

·         infected animals

·         Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. There is no evidence that mosquitos or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus.

Objective 2: Participants should learn recommended precautions for management of hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola virus disease. 

Answer: Standard, contact, and droplet precautions are recommended for management of hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola virus disease. 

Objective 3:  Participants should be comfortable with the proper use of personal protective equipment recommended for; 1) travelers returning from West Africa, 2) contacts of suspected or known Ebola patients, and 3) hospitalized patients under investigation or treatment for Ebola Virus Disease.

Dr. Murphree is a 16-year employee of the Centers for Disease and Prevention with assignments in Vectorborne Infectious Diseases, Global Migration and Quarantine, Epidemic Intelligence Service, and Career Epidemiology Field Officer Program.  During the past five years assigned to the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), she served in leadership roles during response to the importation of travelers infected with Ebola Virus, Middle Eastern Respiratory Virus and Chikungunya Virus, led  state-wide activities to contact and track ~1,100 at-risk patients potentially exposed to contaminated methylprednisolone, coordinated Tennessee’s participation in a multi-state investigation of internal contamination with radioactive strontium following rubidium rb-82 generator cardiac PET scan, and led the study that documented zoonotic transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from captive elephants to humans.  Dr. Murphree recently returned from a 30-day deployment to Monrovia, Liberia where she served as the CDC advisor to the Monrovia/Montserrado County Health Team during the Ebola Virus Outbreak.

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Nov
5
2:10pm 2:10pm

Breakout 1b: Shooter Self Care

Kelly Grayson, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P

If you’re a shooter, and you don’t carry a first aid kit, you’re leaving the house unprepared. Given the remote location and lack of appropriate first aid facilities at most shooting ranges, being prepared to treat yourself or your buddy until EMS arrives can literally mean the difference between life and death. Most ranges I frequent have no AED, their first aid-kits amount to little more than a plastic box full of Bandaids and a few gauze pads, and the most absorbent dressings they have are found on a roll in the Porta John.

But equipment is only half the equation. Proper training is just as important.

A number of people over the years have approached me to teach first aid classes for shooters. Problem is, no such canned course exists. The only thing that comes close is Tactical Combat Casualty Care, which is primarily aimed at combat medics and corpsmen operating under battlefield conditions.

However, for any of you interested, I have put together a self-care class for gunshot wounds at the NRA Annual Meeting in Indianapolis. It’ll be taught by shooters (all of whom happen to be medics and EMT instructors), for shooters. We’ll cover:

·         Recognition and management of life-threatening bleeding
·         Use of combat tourniquets
·         Hemostatic dressings
·         Occlusive dressings
·         Thoracic trauma treatment
·         Eye injuries

Kelly Grayson, is a critical care paramedic in Louisiana. He has spent the past 18 years as a field paramedic, critical care transport paramedic, field supervisor and educator. He is a former president of the Louisiana EMS Instructor Society and board member of the LA Association of Nationally Registered EMTs.

He is a frequent EMS conference speaker and contributor to various EMS training texts, and is the author of the popular blog A Day In the Life of an Ambulance Driver. The paperback version of Kelly's book is available at booksellers nationwide. You can follow him on Twitter (@AmboDriver) or Facebook (www.facebook.com/theambulancedriverfiles), or email him at kelly.grayson@ems1.com.

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Nov
5
2:10pm 2:10pm

Breakout 2b: Boating Disasters

Captain Matt Majors
Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency

Many SAR agencies have been skeptical about TWRA involvement in recovery cases.  The attendee will learn how/why TWRA would be on scene and how we can use our tools (ROV) to help them achieve their mission. The goal of this presentation is to inform the learner of this new/emerging technology, when/where it can be used, and the time/cost savings for each department of medical/first responders. Students will also learn how TWRA can assist with search recovery as requested but will not be the lead on those operation.

Matt is a statewide boating accident investigator for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.  His role is to assist officers or lead serious injury/fatality/high profile boating investigations throughout the state with the help from two other investigators.  Matt also handles marine theft issues and boating training throughout the state.  He is currently the statewide coordinator for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Honor Guard and an active member of the TWRA dive team.

 During his service, Matt has been stationed near some of the busiest boating lakes in Tennessee and has been the lead investigator on over 100 property damage, serious injury, and fatality incidents.  His investigations have lead to the prosecution of charges including vehicular homicide, criminally negligent homicide, felony vehicular assault, boating under the influence, felony leaving the scene of an accident with injury, navigation rules violations, reckless operation of a vessel, and various other charges.

 Matt began his career in law-enforcement after graduating from Tennessee Technological University with a BS degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Science.  He was employed by the North Carolina State Parks as a State Ranger for 4 years before moving back to Tennessee as a Wildlife Officer for Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.   Matt was the recipient of the 2005 Tennessee Wildlife Officer of the Year award and the 2005 SEAFWA Wildlife Officer of the Year. In 2006, he was the recipient of the Tennessee State Boating Officer of the Year.

 Matt is a current instructor in Tennessee for subjects in the field of Marine Theft, NASBLA Boat Accident Investigation and Boating under the Influence Detection, Emergency Vessel Operations, Close Quarters Boat Handling, and Open Water Boat Handling. 

 Matt, currently a NASBLA instructor for the Boat Accident Investigation Program, is also the Committee Chair for the NASBLA Enforcement and Training Committee.  He has served on this committee for the past three years.  He has also participated in the NASBLA staged boat collision project in 2009.

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Nov
5
12:30pm12:30pm

Breakout 1a: CSI

Maureen Velez, Trooper Tennessee Highway Patrol

Scene documentation is crucial with regard to any type of critical incident. Whether it be a vehicle crash or a disaster on a massive scale, it is necessary to record the aftermath to assist with the reconstruction of the event. This documentation may also provide useful data from which training opportunities for law enforcement and first responders can be developed.

 One of the primary tools utilized for scene documentation is the camera and a basic understanding of the camera will enable an investigator to more accurately photograph a scene. This four hour block of photography instruction will train novice photographers in camera basics and how to photograph special situations such as incidents that occur in low light or at night.

Trooper Maureen Velez began her career in law enforcement, in 2006, as a Deputy with the Hardeman County Sheriff’s Department.  In 2008, she accepted a position with the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) and began recruit school in August of that year. Upon her graduation from cadet school, she was assigned to a road patrol position in Tipton County in the Memphis District.

In January 2010, Velez joined the Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT), operating in the Memphis and Jackson Districts. During her time with CIRT, she has become certified to teach and has been a guest instructor at the THP Training Academy for At-Scene, Advanced Crash Investigation and Crash Reconstruction. She has also been an adjunct instructor for Cadet Class 512.

Trooper Velez’s educational background includes a Bachelor’s Degree in Photography from Florida State University. She is currently attending Southern Illinois University’s Masters of Business Administration program.

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Nov
5
12:30pm12:30pm

Breakout 2a: Mayberry to NCIS

Brad Wilbanks, Lt Tennessee Highway Patrol
Travic Plotzer, Sgt Tennessee Highway Patrol
 

From Mayberry to NCIS is a powerpoint presentation that will walk you and your class through the transitions Tennessee Highway Patrol has developed over the last 50 plus years. It will show you how THP has been the premier law enforcement agency over the years. We also will show ways we can partner with your agency to assist on a variety of assignments.

Brad Wilbanks currently serves as Lieutenant overseeing the Tennessee Highway Patrol-Jackson District, Special Programs Unit.  Brad was appointed to this position in October, 2010.  He has since spent his time and effort promoting safety for those that live, work or travel within the State of Tennessee. Since becoming a Tennessee State Trooper in January of 1989, Brad has served many roles within the Tennessee Department of Safety. Early in his career, he spent a three year assignment as an undercover agent and participated in hundreds of illegal drug operations as well as gathering intelligence on organized crime and individuals that were considered a high risk to our community.

In 1999, Brad was asked to supervise the newly formed Tennessee Highway Patrol Interdiction Unit for the West Tennessee Area. During his five year assignment, the Interdiction Unit was responsible for illegal drug and money seizures totaling over three hundred million dollars and the arrest of numerous fugitives.  Brad has taken advantage of the training that has been offered to him and has successfully earned certification in several fields including crash reconstruction, firearms instruction and range inspector. He is a commercial motor vehicle industry expert with Hazardous Materials, Cargo Tank, Post-Crash and Level VI Radioactive Inspector credentials. He is a 2012 graduate of the Northwestern School of Police Staff and Command. Brad resides in Jackson, TN with his wife, Jody.

Plotzer got his interest in law enforcement by being a Law Enforcement Explorer. He began working for the Dickson Police Department in 2002-2005 as a Communications Officer. While working there he attended Nashville State Community College where he earned an Associates Degree in Police Administration. He also did an Internship with the 23rd Judicial Drug Task Force during that time frame. He started working for the Tennessee Highway Patrol in 2005. He has worked the road in Cheatham, Dickson, Humphreys, Houston, Stewart, Rutherford, and Williamson Counties. He was assigned to the Criminal Interdiction Unit. He also has served as an Evidence Custodian for 12 counties. He is a crash reconstructionsist, radar instructor, Operation Lifesaver presenter, commercial vehicle instructor, level 1 commercial vehicle inspector, post crash reconstructionist for commercial vehicles and assistant system administrator for evidence tracking software for Tennessee Highway Patrol. Plotzer was promoted to Sergeant in the Special Programs Unit in the Nashville District. Job duties include public education, pupil transportation, new entrant program, commercial vehicle trainer, and hand gun range inspector. 
 

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Nov
5
10:30am10:30am

Main Session #3- 360 Degree Forensic Mapping

Justin Boyd, Sgt Tennessee Highway Patrol

 One of the critical issues that arise during a disaster event is the myriad of agencies that respond. A lack of inter-departmental training complicates this issue. This block of instruction will introduce attendants to the Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT), a specialized unit with the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP). CIRT is a statewide unit comprised of crash reconstructionists. Members in the unit have received technical training in the area of forensic diagramming by way of a Total Station and a Leica 360 Scanner. CIRT has assisted multiple agencies with evidence collection and gathering the necessary information to create a To-Scale diagrams. A live demonstration will showcase the documentation possibilities of the Total Station and the 360 scanner.

 

I began my career with the Highway Patrol on January 13, 2002.  Upon completion of the academy I was assigned to the Nashville District in Rutherford County.  I worked as a road trooper for 8 ½ years in Rutherford County. The last five years, on the road, I was a Field Training Officer (FTO).   I was assigned to the Critical Incident Response Team Three (3) on October 1, 2010.  While on the CIRT unit, I have been a lead instructor teaching At-Scene Crash Investigation, Advance Crash Investigation, and Traffic Crash Reconstruction to members of the Highway Patrol.  On October 31, 2013, I was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and assigned to the Critical Incident Response Team Four (4). 

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Nov
5
9:15am 9:15am

Main Session #2- Saving Your Own Life: Confessions of a Clinically Depressed Responder

Kelly Grayson, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P

 Depression, PTSD, mental illness. We deal with their effects every day. They’re the patients that often challenge our skills and our sense of compassion the most. We dislike dealing with them so much that we often ignore those symptoms in ourselves until it drives us from the career we once loved, or we read the obituaries of our brothers for whom help came too late. Join Kelly Grayson as he describes his battle with depression, and explores strategies for recognizing and dealing with those issues in ourselves. It’s time to erase the stigma of provider mental illness, because even the healers need healing now and then.

Kelly Grayson, is a critical care paramedic in Louisiana. He has spent the past 18 years as a field paramedic, critical care transport paramedic, field supervisor and educator. He is a former president of the Louisiana EMS Instructor Society and board member of the LA Association of Nationally Registered EMTs.

He is a frequent EMS conference speaker and contributor to various EMS training texts, and is the author of the popular blog A Day In the Life of an Ambulance Driver. The paperback version of Kelly's book is available at booksellers nationwide. You can follow him on Twitter (@AmboDriver) or Facebook (www.facebook.com/theambulancedriverfiles), or email him at kelly.grayson@ems1.com.

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Nov
5
8:00am 8:00am

Main Session #1 - Responding to the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak in Monrovia, Liberia—Crippled Infrastructure, Uncontrolled Morbidity, and Mass Casualty Lessons for Tennessee

Dr. Rendi Murphree
Centers For Disease and Prevention

During this lecture, Dr. Murphree will provide an account of her deployment to Monrovia, Liberia supporting the fight to stop the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak by providing technical assistance and subject matter expertise to the Monrovia/Montserrado County Health Team.  Montserrado has a population of 1.3 million (25% of Liberia) and they reported >40% of Liberian patients and deaths attributed to EVD during her time in-country.  The magnitude and scope of EVD outbreak exceeds any disaster experienced by our generation of responders.  Dr. Murphree will share her experiences as they apply towards improving capacity for response to health threats in Tennessee.

Objective 1:  Participants will be familiar with the challenges of emergency response in settings with limited or damaged infrastructure.

Objective 2:  Participants will understand the importance of re-building healthcare systems for interrupting the chain of transmission for Ebola Virus Disease.

Objective 3:  Participants will consider the difficulties of mass casualty management experienced by Liberia and use lessons learned to improve planning in Tennessee.

 

Dr. Murphree is a 16-year employee of the Centers for Disease and Prevention with assignments in Vectorborne Infectious Diseases, Global Migration and Quarantine, Epidemic Intelligence Service, and Career Epidemiology Field Officer Program.  During the past five years assigned to the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), she served in leadership roles during response to the importation of travelers infected with Ebola Virus, Middle Eastern Respiratory Virus and Chikungunya Virus, led  state-wide activities to contact and track ~1,100 at-risk patients potentially exposed to contaminated methylprednisolone, coordinated Tennessee’s participation in a multi-state investigation of internal contamination with radioactive strontium following rubidium rb-82 generator cardiac PET scan, and led the study that documented zoonotic transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from captive elephants to humans.  Dr. Murphree recently returned from a 30-day deployment to Monrovia, Liberia where she served as the CDC advisor to the Monrovia/Montserrado County Health Team during the Ebola Virus Outbreak.

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Nov
5
7:40am 7:40am

Welcome

Welcome 
     Jimmy Harris - Madison County Mayor
Color Guard
     Jackson Fire Department
National Anthem
     Union University Singers Group "Proclamation"
Prayer
      Union University Staff
Conference Overview & CEH Process
     Stacey Wilson

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